10.2 Quiz Critical Thinking by Example


1. “[1] NASA is getting ready to launch its latest probe, named “Curiosity”, to Mars. [2] Some people say that we should not be sending more probes to Mars [3] because they are expensive, [4] and we have a large federal deficit. [5] However, Curiosity is being sent to look for signs of life. [6] The discovery of life on Mars would be the scientific discovery of the century, [7] so it is worth the cost. [8] It is true that previous probes have failed to find life, [9] but Curiosity is far more advanced in its instrumentation compared with our earlier efforts.” Proposition [7] is best described as

a) a premise in support of the author’s argument.
b) a conclusion of the author’s argument.
c) a counterconsideration.
d) a premise in support of a counterargument to the author’s argument.
e) a conclusion of a counterargument to the author’s argument.
2. “[1] NASA is getting ready to launch its latest probe, named “Curiosity”, to Mars. [2] Some people say that we should not be sending more probes to Mars [3] because they are expensive, [4] and we have a large federal deficit. [5] However, Curiosity is being sent to look for signs of life. [6] The discovery of life on Mars would be the scientific discovery of the century, [7] so it is worth the cost. [8] It is true that previous probes have failed to find life, [9] but Curiosity is far more advanced in its instrumentation compared with our earlier efforts.” Proposition [8] is best described as

a) a premise in support of the author’s argument.
b) a conclusion of the author’s argument.
c) a counterconsideration.
d) a premise in support of a counterargument to the author’s argument.
e) a conclusion of a counterargument to the author’s argument.
3. “John must be sad because Steve just broke up with him.” This passage is best understood as an


a) an argument.
b) an explanation.
c) neither an argument nor an explanation.
4. “John is sad because Steve just broke up with him.” This passage is best understood as an

a) an argument.
b) an explanation.
c) neither an argument nor an explanation.
5. “Scientists met with congressional leaders to explain why the search for life on Mars is so important.”
This passage is best understood as an

a) an argument.
b) an explanation.
c) neither an argument nor an explanation.
6. “The President tried to convince his critics that military action in Libya does require congressional approval, since the U.S. is merely supporting a NATO lead mission.”
This passage is best understood as an

a) an argument.
b) an explanation.
c) neither an argument nor an explanation.
7. “We must decide: should we stay or should we go?”
This passage is best understood as an

a) an argument.
b) an explanation.
c) neither an argument nor an explanation.
8. “Either we should stay or we should go. If we stay, there will be trouble. If we go, it will be double. So, there will be trouble either way.” This passage contains:


a) 1 proposition.
b) 2 propositions.
c) 3 propositions.
d) 4 propositions.
e) 5 propositions.
9. “I think marijjunana should be legalized. Does the government have a right to tell us what to do to our bodies when we don’t hurt anyone else?
This passage contains:

a) 1 proposition.
b) 2 propositions.
c) 3 propositions.
d) 4 propositions.
e) 5 propositions.
10. “I think the NFL season will go ahead because we need our football. Congress won’t allow us to suffer; I’m sure they will step in, if necessary.
This passage contains:

a) 1 proposition.
b) 2 propositions.
c) 3 propositions.
d) 4 propositions.
e) 5 propositions.
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