6.4 Quiz Critical Thinking by Example


1. "Mindy: Scientists in the U.S. are advocating implanting human brain cells into mice. Some people think it is immoral to create hybrid or chimerical creatures. The scientists pushing for this research, however, are the experts. We should listen to them.

Nancy: I can’t believe you are saying this Mindy. This sounds a lot like the experiments of the Nazi scientists.

Ofelia: Sorry Nancy, you’re wrong. We are trying to have a rational discussion and you are just being hysterical.

Pamela: Scientists should be able to conduct these experiments. Really it is no big deal. We already have hybrids. Scientists have used baboon hearts to keep patients alive. There are also diabetic patients who have received pig cells to produce insulin to cure their afflication.

Quinn: Survey after survey shows that the American public does not want to go down the road to hybrids. This research is morally wrong.

Roberta: Think of where we would be today if Copernicus did not dare suggest that the earth moves around the sun. Imagine if Darwin had kept silent about his theory of natural selection. Where would be? Progress is made by visionaries who are not afraid to go against accepted thinking. I applaud these scientists for their vision and their courage. It is clear what needs to be done."

The conclusion of Mindy's argument is "Some people think it is immoral to create hybrid or chimerical creatures."

a) True
b) False
2. The best evaluation of Mindy's argument is

a) a good argument.
b) it commits the fallacy of Guilt by Association
c) it commits the fallacy of Appeal to the Majority.
d) it commits the fallacy of Appeal to the Select Few.
e) it commits the Gambler’s Fallacy.
f) it commits the fallacy of Appeal to Tradition.
g) it commits the fallacy of Improper Appeal to an Epistemic Authority.

3. The conclusion of Nancy's argument is that scientists should not implant human brain cells into mice.

a) True.
b) False.
4. The best evaluation of Nancy's argument is

a) a good argument.
b) it commits the fallacy of Guilt by Association
c) it commits the fallacy of Appeal to the Majority.
d) it commits the fallacy of Appeal to the Select Few.
e) it commits the Gambler’s Fallacy.
f) it commits the fallacy of Appeal to Tradition.
g) it commits the fallacy of Improper Appeal to an Epistemic Authority.

5. The conclusion of Ofelia's argument is that scientists should not implant human brain cells into mice.

a) True.
b) False.
6. The best evaluation of Ofelia's argument is

a) a good argument.
b) it commits the fallacy of Guilt by Association
c) it commits the fallacy of Appeal to the Majority.
d) it commits the fallacy of Appeal to the Select Few.
e) it commits the Ad Hominem fallacy.
f) it commits the fallacy of Appeal to Tradition.
g) it commits the fallacy of Improper Appeal to an Epistemic Authority.

7. The best evaluation of Pamela's argument is

a) a good argument.
b) it commits the fallacy of Guilt by Association
c) it commits the fallacy of Appeal to the Majority.
d) it commits the fallacy of Appeal to the Select Few.
e) it commits the Gambler’s Fallacy.
f) it commits the fallacy of Appeal to Tradition.
g) it commits the fallacy of Improper Appeal to an Epistemic Authority.

8. The best evaluation of Quinn's argument is

a) a good argument.
b) it commits the fallacy of Guilt by Association
c) it commits the fallacy of Appeal to the Majority.
d) it commits the fallacy of Appeal to the Select Few.
e) it commits the Gambler’s Fallacy.
f) it commits the fallacy of Appeal to Tradition.
g) it commits the fallacy of Improper Appeal to an Epistemic Authority.

9. The conclusion of Roberta's argument is that scientists should be allowed to implant human brain cells in mice.

a) True.
b) False
10. The best evaluation of Roberta's argument is

a) it is a good argument.
b) it commits the fallacy of Guilt by Association.
c) it commits the fallacy of Appeal to the Majority.
d) it commits the Gambler’s Fallacy.
e) it commits the fallacy of Appeal to the Select Few.
f) it commits the fallacy of Appeal to Tradition.
g) it commits the fallacy of Improper Appeal to an Epistemic Authority

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