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Critical Thinking By Example

 Table of Contents
 

Overview:

This website is evolving, here is the eventual goal: there will be 10 chapters with 10 quizzes for each chapter. Each quiz will have 10 questions, this means there will be eventually a total of 1000 multiple-choice questions for students to practice their critical thinking skills. (As of this writing, July 2011, there are about 300 multiple-choice questions). The chapters are designed to be tackled sequentially. The contents are described below:

 

Chapter 1: Basic Standardizing

  •     1.1 Two Conventions for Standardizing

  •     1.2 Five argument Types

Chapter 2: Basic Argument Evaluation

  •     2.1 The definition of a good argument

  •   2.2 Three Fallacies

Chapter 3: Necessary and Sufficient Conditions

  •     3.1 The meaning of necessary and sufficient conditions

  •     3.2 Conditionals and necessary and sufficient conditions

  •     3.3 The relationship between conditional and disguised conditionals

  •     3.4 Contrapositive

Chapter 4: Validity

  •     4.1 Valid and invalid arguments

Chapter 5: Intermediate Standardizing

  •     5.1 Premise and conclusion indicators

  •     5.2 Missing premises

Chapter 6: Fallacies of Relevance

  •     6.1 Twelve fallacies of relevance

Chapter 7: Sufficiency

  •     7.1 Sufficiency and deductive and inductive arguments

  •     7.2 Fallacies of sufficiency

Chapter 8: Accepting Premises: Considerations of Logic and Language

  •     8.1 Fallacies in accepting premises

  •     8.2 Logical considerations in accepting premises

  •     8.3 Considerations of language in accepting premises

Chapter 9: Accepting Premises: The Question of Evidence

  •     9.1 Premises based on common knowledge of the target audience

  •     9.2 Premises based on experience

  •     9.3 Premises based on epistemic authority

Chapter 10: Advanced Standardizing

  •     10.1 Identifying arguments

  •     10.2 Individuating propositions

  •     10.3 Counter considerations and counter arguments

 

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